Marvel x Ippudo

Who ever thought super heroes and ramen could coexist in the same stratosphere of a collaborative event? Well, that just became a reality because we’re here to report on the latest Avengers Interactive Ramen pop-up event Ippudo is hosting for two days, from February 25th to the 26th limited to forty seats. Similar to previous events, this was held in their hidden second floor Ramen Bar in their Midtown West location.

Upon entering, we observed staff sporting what appeared to be superhero masks and current Marvel TV series’ posters covering the wall. We were seated and immediately served a delicious brew of Nanbu Bijin Ruten, a premium Ginjo Sake that comes from the northern part of Japan, along with a cute little “Pickled Alien” of baby octopus in sweet and sour brine. We were instructed to dunk the octopus in our sake, similar to how a string of olives would sit in a dirty martini. The combination was a surprisingly delicious bite of sweet and tangy chewy octopus.

Next came the star of the meal, the Avengers ramen. This came with a beautiful three-year aged Iberico pork soup, blended with an organic chicken stock. The aged pork was a representation of Marvel’s founding in 1939, and the chicken soup pointed to Marvel’s “soaring” success in the present day. Another quirky metaphorical dimension to this soup included the Iberico pork broth as “Ironman 1 soup,” and the combination of the pork and chicken soup created, “Ironman 2 soup.” In addition, all the ingredients in this dish stood for a superhero reference. The green noodles represented the “Hulk,” the one strand of red noodle the “Black Widow,” the poached egg the “Arc Reactor” from Ironman, star-shaped fishcakes were Captain America’s shield, the deep fried lamb chops marinated and coated in béchamel were Thor’s hammer, and last but not least, the baguette toast with seafood sauce and garlic sauce represented Ironman 3. With all these ingredients, we were able to enjoy this ramen dish in so many ways. The soup on it’s own was a delicate light broth, but when the poached egg was cracked and the seafood and garlic sauce from the baguette were mixed, it created a beautiful creamy soup that melded perfectly with the fresh green noodles.

We hope that you enjoyed this recap, and keep your eyes peeled for more exciting events to come!

Ippudo
321 W 51st St, New York, NY 10019
(212) 974-2500

Ippudo Tsukemen

This fall, Ippudo has come out with a new addition to their menu, Atsumori Tsukemen. We’ve mentioned a chriashi tsukemen before in our Ippudo x Engineered Garments post, but this time we’re introducing a dish readily available to the public. Ippudo is one of the few ramen shops in New York City to serve tsukemen style noodles, and in our opinion one of the best!

So what is tsukemen exactly? Tsukemen is a dipping style noodle dish, where extra thick noodles are dipped in a rich broth concentrate. Imagine cold soba noodles but with ramen noodles and ramen broth. Ippudo’s version, Atsumori tsukemen is a blend of sea and citrus. The broth consists of kelp and konbu-cha with a delightfully fresh hint of yuzu. One great thing about this dish is the both and noodles are served hot but separate, allowing for one to enjoy fresh firm noodles that don’t turn soft or soggy.
Head over to Ippudo’s uptown or downtown location for some seriously fresh tsukemen, the wait won’t disappoint!

Ippudo
65 4th Ave, New York, NY 10003
(212) 388-0088

Ippudo Westside
321 W 51st St, New York, NY 10019
(212) 974-2500

www.ippudony.com

Ippudo X Engineered Garments

As you might have read in our post from several months back, we’re a huge fan of Ippudo. On a very cold Monday night, my sister and I headed to a special event uptown at Ippudo Westside. This special event celebrated Engineered Garments‘s collaborative creation of Ippudo staff uniforms. Find out more about the collaboration here.

After a drink or two at the bar, we were escorted upstairs to find chopsticks and black sleeping masks awaiting us. Once we were served a savory delicious warm katsuo (bonito) and kombu (seaweed) broth called ichiban dashi, we were instructed to cover our eyes and wait for the main course to be revealed.

When finally released from the darkness, we opened our eyes to a very colorful bowl of what looked like Chirashi-sushi (direct translation: scattered sushi). The dish was also accompanied with a side of stuffed squid filled with savory sticky rice. Chirashi-sushi typically has sushi rice topped with a selection of sashimi. However, in this case, instead of the sushi rice, there was a thick layer of ramen hidden beneath a delightful bed of finely shredded omelette, salmon roe and sashimi. When eaten together, the eggs and fish blended well with the thick noodles, giving an equal mixture of sushi and ramen flavor.

EG x Ippudo 3

The texture and weight of the noodles were perfect for tsukemen (ramen eaten with dipping sauce), and as I was commenting on this fact, a bowl of warm broth made its appearance. Tsukemen noodles are usually thicker allowing more surface area to absorb the concentrated ramen broth.

Not only did we enjoy the meal, it was delightful to witness the clever transformation of chirashi-ramen to tsukemen. If Ippudo ever decides to put this “chirashi-tsukemen” on their menu, we are sure that it will be an instant hit!

Ippudo Westside
321 W 51st St, New York, NY 10019
(212) 974-2500

http://www.ippudony.com/

Ippudo

If you want to experience authentic Japanese ramen, but are stuck in New York, Ippudo is the place to go. Since it’s grand opening in 2008, this world famous ramen shop has gained so much popularity, even six years later, you will find yourself waiting in a very, very long line. Here are three special dishes at Ippudo that we truly feel worth sharing:

SHIROMARU HAKATA CLASSIC

Hakata is a specific type of ramen found in the southern region of Japan called Kyushu. The special qualities Hakata ramen has, and also what Ippudo’s Shiromaru Hakata Classic adopts, is a thick creamy pork broth with thin noodles. Also, this dish comes with distinct toppings, which include pickled ginger, pickled bamboo, a slice of pork, and a hand full of chopped scallions. Despite this dish sounding pork heavy, it was quite light and the simplicity of the dish helped us appreciate every flavor.

AKAMARU MODERN

On the other hand, the Akamaru Modern is a more complex dish. Although the basis of the soup is the traditional creamy Hakata broth, it comes with more playful elements such as garlic oil, Ippudo’s “Umami Dama,” a secret miso paste, pork chashu, cabbage, kikurage mushrooms, and scallions. With all these different flavors, this dish is more on the heavy side, but all these toppings add a bit of fun, making you crave for more.

HIRATA BUNS

Finally, we come to the pork buns. Every time I meet a person who has gone to Ippudo, they all mention how amazing the pork buns are. We cannot agree more, the pork buns are truly delectable. The pork is melt-in-your-mouth with a very distinct flavoring that is somehow very distinctly Japanese. It also comes with mayo and crispy lettuce. Be sure to order this as an appetizer!

Ippudo
65 4th Ave, New York, NY 10003
(212) 388-0088

Ippudo Westside
321 W 51st St, New York, NY 10019
(212) 974-2500

www.ippudony.com

Sobaya

On a hot summer night in Tokyo, our mother would prepare cold soba noodles with a side of sliced tomatoes. This dinner was simple, but perfect for our waning appetite from the heat. We found our hunger exponentially grow as we slurped up bite after bite.

To be honest, both of us have never enjoyed Japanese food in New York. It’s hard to indulge in a plate of California rolls, or a bowl of green tea sesame soba noodles when we’ve grown up with the real deal for over 10 years. My sister and I can both attest to the times when our cravings for Japanese food would get the best of us. Whether it was an order from Seamless, or a trip to a local Japanese restaurant, we would be left unsatisfied, the mediocre and westernized “Japanese food” rolling around in our stomachs.

However, Soba-ya is an exception. Their handmade buckwheat noodles are prepared with buckwheat flour from Nagoya, a prefecture in Japan where soba is a specialty. We ordered the Ten Zaru soba, a cold noodle dish served with tempura, which is a deep fried japanese dish. The cold noodles had a particular chew to them, and the tempura, fried shishito peppers, shrimp, and shiso leaf were light and crispy. This dish is simple yet filling, perfect for those hot humid summer days.

Sobaya
229 E 9th St, New York, NY 10003
(212) 533-6966
www.sobaya-nyc.com